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Conservation

The Line Is Drawn in the Gravel: When It Comes to Industry, Choose Carefully

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Article by Amanda Follett Hosgood

We all know that industry is part of living in northern BC: logging trucks roll past on the highways, trains carrying cargo rumble through our communities, and thousands of tourists visit every year in airplanes and RVs. Even the fishing industry contributes to the clatter with motorized river access and fly-in camps. All that said, these are our jobs and livelihoods and what makes life in the north possible.  

But we believe, when it comes to industry, that we must choose carefully. If we want to preserve our rivers, landscapes, and wildlife by promoting low-impact industries like tourism, we need to be forward-thinking about the projects we allow in our valley. That’s why Frontier Farwest has been closely monitoring a proposed gravel pit downri...

Fisherman's 5 with Sean Johnson

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The Fisherman's 5 is a new series we are running here at Epic Waters, so keep your eye out for it in the upcoming weeks.  We will be asking folks who have been in the fishing industry for many years 5 questions to answer honestly.  Expect to hear from guides, marketing experts, casting champions, rod and reel builders and much more.  Our industry has changed a lot over the last decade and many of these people have been leading the way. 

Our first guest in the fisherman 5 is Sean Johnson who lives in Bend, Oregon and has been in the fishing industry for over 25 years.  

Sean and I guided together in Chile in the early 2000's and after that he spent many years as head guide at Kulik Lodge in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Currently Sean specializes in helping companies with...

Keeping the fight for our coastal fish simple

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Many things have contributed to the great decrease in salmon populations up and down the coast.  There are plenty of arguments to suggest we should sit idly by with our hands tied. Many   believe we understand so little about the causes that it’s a waste of time and money to try to stop it, or maybe they just give up thinking its things we can’t help like loss of habitat, or climate change. Others have been lulled to sleep by being handed yearly batches of hatchery fish.  Many simply believe salmon are resilient enough that if we leave them alone they will bounce back.  

However there are two scientifically proven causes that have destroyed most of our fisheries up and down the coast.  Two tangible issues that can very easily be focused on and changed to help preserve what is left of our coa...

Threats to steelhead

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A 1996 study of all anadromous or ocean-going fish stocks in British Columbia and Yukon documented that 142 separate stocks or runs have already gone extinct out of a total of 9,662. In the United States, which has endured far more human impacts to Steelhead and salmon rivers and their watersheds, have lost over 400 indigenous stocks (29%) of the 1400 that originally existed. The majority of remaining native salmon and steelhead runs are endangered or highly threatened with vanishing forever.

The Skeena watershed represents one of the last true large river strongholds of wild, native Steelhead and salmon in North America. While the Department of Fisheries began “stock enhancement” of the much-prized sockeye fishery in the Babine River in 1970, all of the Steelhead and other 4 species of salmon represent the original...

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